Stellarator reactor

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Although the main effort of the fusion community for the development of a fusion reactor is focused on the tokamak design (ITER), design studies have been made for a fusion reactor based on the stellarator design. [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6]

The main advantages of the stellarator concept over the tokamak concept are:

  • The density limit is 2 to 5 times higher
  • Performance (beta or β) is not limited by disruptions. β values of up to 5% have been achieved
  • Access to continuous operation due to the reduced amplitude or absence of net plasma current
  • ELMs occur but can be controlled by selecting the magnetic configuration (iota windows or magnetic field ergodicity)
  • The magnetic configuration can be specifically optimized to reduce transport
  • Nearly complete external control of the configuration increases operational robustness and lessens the need for control and feedback systems
  • Stellarator divertors, with long connection lengths and embedded magnetic islands, may mitigate heat loads on target plates by radiating some of the power

References

  1. H. Wobig, The theoretical basis of a drift-optimized stellarator reactor, Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 35 (1993) 903-917
  2. J.F. Lyon and G.H. Neilson, Compact Stellarators, Journal of Fusion Energy 17, 3 (1998) 189-191
  3. G.H. Neilson et al, Physics issues in the design of high-beta, low-aspect-ratio stellarator experiments, Phys. Plasmas 7 (2000) 1911
  4. C.D. Beidler et al, Stellarator Fusion Reactors - an overview, J. Plasma Fusion Res. SERIES 5 (2002) 149-155
  5. H. Wobig and F. Wagner, Nuclear Energy. Chapter 7, Magnetic confinement fusion: stellarator (2005) ISBN 978-3-540-42891-6
  6. R.C. Wolf et al, A stellarator reactor based on the optimization criteria of Wendelstein 7-X, Fusion Engineering and Design 83, Issues 7-9 (2008) 990-996